Ngondro, the preliminary or foundational practices of Vajrayana Buddhism, is a profound and powerful means of affecting transformation through purification and the vast accumulation of merit. (Vajrayana Foundation)

—ooo000ooo— 

“If there are any wise persons who desire to be completely freed
From the hot torments of the fire pit of samsara, they should
Rely on this supreme path, Ngondro, which, like the king of trees, 
Will revive one in its cool, dense shade, enlightenment.”
(His Holiness Dudjom Rinpoche)

—ooo000ooo—

“…Ngondro, which like the king of trees, will revive one in its cool, dense shade – enlightement.” (HH Dudjom Jigdral Yeshe Dorje Rinpoche)

—ooo000ooo—

“As an example of the importance of Ngondro, if someone wants to build… the most important part is the foundation in order for the building to be stable.” (Dungse Thinley Norbu Rinpoche)

—ooo000ooo—

The Four Thoughts that Turn the Mind are the basis of Ngondro and all Buddhist practices. (Vajrayana Foundation)

—ooo000ooo—

“Since it contains all paths to enlightenment, every effort should be made to complete Ngondro… There is no doubt that this practice will give you the realization of Buddhahood.” (Lama Tharchin Rinpoche)

—ooo000ooo—

We have been wandering in delusion in samsara since beginningless time, like being trapped in a dream. The dharma is the method the Buddha taught to wake us up…the condensed essence of all teachings is Ngondro. (Lama Sonam Rinpoche)

Reflection:
Nowadays many people rush through ngondro eager for “advanced” practices. No practices are more important than these. Do you know what many of the great masters of Tibet did once they completed their ngondro? They started ngondro again from the very beginning. I know highly realized lamas who completed ngondro sixteen times. Many great lamas practiced ngondro at the end of their lives. Ngondro was the first step and the last. As we progress in ngondro, the practices as well as the views demand more of us, yet each step prepares us for the next, so it’s quite workable. Please take these words to heart. Don’t rush. Don’t imagine “more important” practices than these. One step at a time really can turn our mind from confusion to clarity.
(Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche)

Photo credit: Eva Peck

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather